Archive for May, 2010


Remembering the Late, Great, Dennis Hopper

Film legend Dennis Hopper passed away today at the age of 74. The man was a true artist, a truly creative mind and a rebel. Always a good sport, an excellent story teller and a hypnotic actor, Dennis Hopper began his career as a character actor with small supporting roles in films like Rebel Without a Cause and Cool Hand Luke but would gain world wide recognition after directing and co-starring alongside Peter Fonda in the award winning Easy Rider. The film launched his career along with those of his co-stars and he found himself starring in such films as Mad Dog Morgan and Apocalypse Now.

Hopper entered a drug rehabilitation center in 1983 after a daredevil stunt (involving himself, a coffin and several sticks of TNT) was interpreted as a suicide attempt. By this time in Dennis Hoppers life, according to his account in the documentary film “Easy Rider, Raging Bulls” his cocaine intake had reached 3 grams a day, complimented by about 30 beers, weed, and Cuba Libres.

It wasn’t until 1986 that Dennis Hopper landed his remarkable, career defining role in David Lynch’s Blue Velvet, the part that pumped new blood into Hopper’s career. The character’s name was Frank Booth, a foul mouthed, abusive, gas huffing, murdering, rapist who represented the darkest, sickest, underbelly of the American dream.

That same year Dennis portrayed Feck the drug dealer in Rivers Edge and would go on to get an Oscar nomination for his role as Shooter in the film Hoosiers. He also directed the critically acclaimed police drama about South Central Los Angeles police officers, Colors.

Dennis was also an acclaimed photographer, sculptor and painter. His most well known photography is his portraiture from the 1960’s. His painting style ranged from the abstract to photorealism.

The man also made some contributions to the art form that is Trash Cinema by bringing to life Super Mario’s arch nemesis King Koopa in the video game to movie adaptation Super Mario Brothers as well as the Messenger of God, Lefty, who brought down Leatherface in The Texas Chainsaw Massacre part 2.

Dennis Hopper may have passed away but the mark this remarkable man left on film and our culture is undeniable. He will most certainly be missed. but that spirit of his, the spirit to create, to dare, and to never be afraid lives on.

Goodbye Dennis. And thank you.


TPR’s Rotten Reviews presents Freddy’s Dead: The Final Nightmare

Hey Gang, Just when I thought I was out, Freddy pulled me right back in to sit through and review the goofiest and least frightening film in his entire repertoire. It also happens to be the poor guys original swan song. That’s right, we’re taking a look at 1991’s laugh a minute Freddy send off, Freddy’s Dead: The Final Nightmare. Get ready for easily solved mysteries! Billy Zane’s sister! No male ass (Check my Nightmare 2 review if you don’t get it)! Post toastie crushing! Quippy one liners that undercut the horror in every scene! Breckin Meyer! Murdering handicapped minorities! A 976-EVIL reference! Adorable Dream Demons! Freddy once again manipulating reality and playing outside the Nightmare on Elm Street rule book! Evil parents! Lame B-List celebrity cameos! Iron Butterfly! Breckin Meyer: The Video Game! Gerbil crushing! Alice Cooper the foster father! Fucking Rainbows! That’s My Freddy! and SO MUCH MORE! Check out this, the second half of our trip down Elm Street’s side street, Memory Lane. Do you really think…Freddy’s Dead? Stay Trashy! – Root


Devil Girl for the Month of May: The Dead Girl

Enjoy our very first set in our ongoing Devil Girl series featuring none other than one of our favorite contributors, The Dead Girl! You may remember her as the topless turkey monster from our Thanksgiving Blood Freak episode from 2009. 😀 She’s a great friend to us here at the Trash Cinema Collective a integral part of the Rotten Reviews. Enjoy her very first as our inaugural Devil Girl.

photography by Daniel Cuevas

Tell me, what’s your favorite Trash Cinema Classic?
Children of the Living Dead

What’s the worst movie you’ve ever seen?
I’ve seen a lot considering that I tend to watch a lot of crappy movies. Especially zombie movies. Probably Hell of the Living Dead.

Got any hobbies?
Video Games, Writing, Wa tching Movies and yes reading.

Who is your all time favorite band?
I can’t pick just one. Nine Inch Nailes, Deftones and one of my new favorites Lamb of God.

Got any critters at home?
3 Cats and 1 dead bunny

What’s your favorite artery clogging junk food?
Red Velvet cupcake with buttercream frosting. Sooo tasty!

Who is your Trash Cinema Hero?
Joe Bob Briggs! He’s the man!

What song lyrics capture your essence and defines you?
She’s a very kinky girl. The kind you won’t take home to mother.

What’s your favorite Halloween costume?

What’s your idea of a good time?
Any time spent with my friends and significant other. 🙂

What’s your ideal song or album to get it on to?
Whatever is playing at the time. LoL!

Trashiest place you’ve ever had sex?
Does a cemetery count as trashy?

I’d say a cemetery definitely counts, Dead Girl!

If you are interested in being a Trash Cinema Collective Devil Girl just take your trashiest photos or scene reenactments from a Trash Cinema Classic and send your photos to:
You must be over 18.


The Good, The Bad, and The Weird: Dongs of Adrenaline

a review by Rex Beavers

Action films have the potential to overwhelm you and move way too fast, and before you know it you find yourself walking to the police station, silently in the dark, with mascara streaming down your face and a head full of bad memories. This is not the case with The Good, The Bad, and The Weird, which is a casual affair that escalates at a natural pace and graduates toward its title characters expertly pounding away at your pleasure centers with a respectful attitude that leaves you feeling good about who you are when wake up in the morning. There is no walk of shame, but when this movie is over the practical result is the same: you have just been gangbanged. The difference this time around is that you were a willing participant. You were an insatiable beast, hungry for intimate appendages made of pure adrenaline.

The Good, The Bad, and The Weird is a Korean western that contains motorcycles and a smattering of 1980’s technology. That is to say it’s quite eclectic, but adeptly so. It takes place in a time not represented by any single moment in history and concerns three central characters who are all in search of a fabled treasure. Their paths cross continually as numerous Korean cowboys dressed like WWII era pilots are laid to waste. The Good, The Bad, and The Weird is a title that describes both its main characters and the styles of action it displays on screen. The Good is the competent hero who takes down evildoers with a high degree of skill, The Bad is an unrepentant villain with an unbridled penchant for violent behavior, and The Weird provides a source of comic relief that catches his opponents off guard when combined with his competence in combat. The tried and true characters combine with a simple plot and an undeniably diverse setting to form the perfect balance of everything you ever loved about action movies. It takes all of the commonplace elements of the action genre and masterfully applies structure and pace in a way that allows its slapstick to co-mingle with explosive action without stepping on the toes of it’s violence.

Tone in action flicks is often applied poorly, ranging from flicks composed entirely of people walking away from explosions in slow motion to films consisting of little more than blood splattering across the frowns of the innocent. The Good, The Bad, and The Weird, however, is a monument to hitting the mark. It employs the best of everything in action films in a wholly satisfying manner. A possible downside is that it does play it a bit closer to the vest than you might be used to. One consequence of its thoughtful pacing is a sacrifice in the more over the top moments you might find in other action flicks, but in doing so it gains a minimal number of low points. But be not afraid, The Good, The Bad, and The Weird is a well done and solid piece of action.

Another thing to note is that because this is a Korean movie, you will be forced to read subtitles, but I promise that someone will get shot in the face before you have any time to form a volatile reaction to being forced to read when what you should really be doing is watching things blow up.

Four stars.


Centurion at Actionfest: A Guy Gets a Spear in the Dick.

a review by Rex Beavers

Oftentimes in cinema, when an axe is swung with full force towards a person’s skull the result is that the weapon remains lodged in the target’s forehead, an expression of surprise remains on the victim’s face, and their corpse falls lifelessly to the ground. Neil Marshall’s Centurion tells a different story, wherein the force of the axe results in a massive explosion of bone and blood and the axe itself falls unencumbered to the ground. Similar stories are told about decapitations that do not occur where the head meets the neck, but begin somewhere around the bridge of the nose. Those fond of the violence and gore as depicted in Neil Marshall’s horror flick The Descent will probably not be left wanting. The violence is brutal, massive, and stunning. Of course, there’s a story to go along with the men and women in this movie who swing the axes and thrust the spears, and it’s a decent one.

In a surprise twist, Neil Marshall’s Centurion follows the story of a roman centurion. He’s a halfway decent dude with the unfortunate quirk of being a member of the power hungry roman army posted far north, and fighting a losing war against the Picts, who are justified in the defense of their homeland but are just as rotten in their own right. Circumstances lead to the centurion becoming a member of an awesomely rag tag band of heroes who would all like to go home and leave the madness of war behind but can only do so under pursuit of the leader of the Picts and his ensemble of stone cold killers who all share the common trait of possessing an all-consuming and unquenchable thirst for vengeance. It’s a simple story that’s told well with solid characters and realistic motives that make the plot easy to digest (although I suspect digestible plot isn’t a high concern among the readership here at the Trash Collective.)

Just before the screening of Centurion that I was present for at the inaugural Actionfest film festival, there was discussion surrounding what genre to pin the flick down in, but I wouldn’t say that there is one unless “The Descent with war instead of ladies in a cave and everyone is a monster” is a genre. Arguments were made that Centurion is a war movie, an action movie, or as a member of the Actionfest staff suggested, a chase movie. While none of these genres are inaccurate, none of them quite pin it down for me and I simply suggest that it is a good movie.

Finally, written praise is deserved by Actionfest and the Carolina theater (with its not one, but TWO bars) in Asheville, NC. Both are either things or places that I cannot wait to visit again. Should Actionfest become an annual event, I highly suggest making plans to attend. They brewed their own Actionfest beer, and that’s a level of dedication I intend to expose myself to as much as possible in this life.

Oh yeah, I wont say when, but at one point, a spear gets thrust into a dick. Four Stars.

Dumpster Diving